2021 Nobel Peace Prize

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The Nobel Peace Prize
Date8 October 2021 (2021-10-08)
LocationOslo
CountryNorway
Presented byNorwegian Nobel Committee
Reward(s)9.0 million SEK
First awarded1901
2021 laureateMaria Ressa, Dmitry Muratov

The 2021 Nobel Peace Prize was announced by the Norwegian Nobel Committee in Oslo on 8 October 2021. Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov received the prize "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace."[1]

The formal award ceremony is scheduled to be held in Oslo on 10 December 2021, the anniversary of Alfred Nobel's death. In 2020 the ceremony returned to its former venue, the Atrium of the University of Oslo Faculty of Law, after being held in Oslo City Hall during the period 1990–2019.[2]

There were 329 candidates for the prize when nominations closed on 31 January 2021.[3] The Norwegian News Agency reported earlier in 2021 that Maria Ressa had been nominated by Jonas Gahr Støre, the designated Prime Minister following the 2021 election.[4]

Nomination process

Different groups of qualified nominators may nominate candidates, including members of national assemblies and national governments, heads of state, judges of certain international courts, (full) professor-level academics in relevant fields, and former laureates; a significant proportion of the nominations are submitted by Norwegian MPs and academics. Nominations are submitted to the Oslo-based Norwegian Nobel Committee, usually in a Scandinavian language (Norwegian, Swedish, Danish) or English. Nominations for the 2021 prize opened on 1 September 2020 and closed on 31 January 2021 (Norwegian time).[3]

Candidates

There are 329 candidates in 2021, 234 individuals and 95 organizations.[5] The Nobel Foundation is not allowed to publish nominations for at least 50 years.[6] Individual nominators can, and sometimes do, choose to publish their nomination, and Norwegian media often report nominations by qualified nominators such as members of parliament and qualified academics.

The Norwegian News Agency reported on 31 January 2021 that the 2021 nominees confirmed by qualified Norwegian nominators (MPs or academics) before the deadline included the following candidates:

Nominations confirmed by the Norwegian News Agency
Nominee Nominator(s) Source
Campaign to Stop Killer Robots Audun Lysbakken, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Alexei Navalny Ola Elvestuen, Mathilde Tybring-Gjedde and Peter Christian Frølich, Members of Parliament [3][4]
Martin Lee Mathilde Tybring-Gjedde and Peter Christian Frølich, Members of Parliament [3][4]
Hong Kong Free Press Ola Elvestuen, Terje Breivik and Jon Gunnes, Members of Parliament [3][4]
International Fact-Checking Network Trine Skei Grande and Tore Storehaug, Members of Parliament [3][4]
Maria Ressa Jonas Gahr Støre, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Reporters Without Borders Sveinung Stensland, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Black Lives Matter Petter Eide, Member of Parliament [3][4]
NATO Erlend Wiborg, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations and GAVI Carl-Erik Grimstad, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Scout movement Solveig Schytz, Member of Parliament [3][4]
Jane Goodall and the Intergovernmental Science-Policy Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) Dag Øistein Endsjø, Professor of Religious Studies [3][4]
Marilyn Waring Margunn Bjørnholt, Professor of Sociology [3][4]
Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya Hårek Elvenes, Jette Christensen and Geir Toskedal, Members of Parliament [3][4]

Laureates

On 8 October 2021 the Nobel Nobel Committee announced its decision to award the prize to journalists Maria Ressa and Dmitry Muratov "for their efforts to safeguard freedom of expression, which is a precondition for democracy and lasting peace."[1]

Muratov said he would have preferred that jailed opposition leader Alexei Navalny was given the award instead.[7]

Prize committee

The members of the Norwegian Nobel Committee are elected by the Norwegian Parliament and are responsible for selecting the laureate in accordance with the will of Alfred Nobel; the committee's members in 2021 are:[8][9]

Prize ceremony

Atrium of the University of Oslo Faculty of Law, the venue of the award ceremony 1947–1989 and since 2020

The award ceremony is scheduled to be held in Oslo on 10 December 2021, the anniversary of Alfred Nobel's death. In 2020 the ceremony returned to its former venue, the Atrium of the University of Oslo Faculty of Law, after being held in Oslo City Hall during the period 1990–2019.[2]

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 "The Nobel Peace Prize 2021". NobelPrize.org (in English). 8 October 2021.
  2. 2.0 2.1 "Dropper utdeling av fredsprisen i Oslo rådhus". Klar Tale. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 "Flere fredsprisforslag før fristen gikk ut". Aftenposten. Norwegian News Agency. 31 January 2021.
  4. 4.00 4.01 4.02 4.03 4.04 4.05 4.06 4.07 4.08 4.09 4.10 4.11 4.12 4.13 4.14 "Hektisk nomineringsaktivitet før fredsprisfrist". Dagsavisen. 31 January 2021.
  5. "Nomination". The Nobel Peace Prize. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  6. "Confidentiality". Nobel Foundation. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  7. "Navalny Deserved Peace Prize, Russian Nobel Winner Says". The New York Times. Retrieved 8 October 2021.
  8. "Valg av medlemmer til Nobelkomiteen". Stortinget. Retrieved 1 February 2021.
  9. "The Norwegian Nobel Committee". The Nobel Peace Prize. Retrieved 9 March 2021.
  10. "Board and council". Norwegian Helsinki Committee. Retrieved 9 March 2021.