(374158) 2004 UL

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(374158) 2004 UL
Discovery[1]
Discovered byLINEAR
Discovery siteLincoln Lab's ETS
Discovery date18 October 2004
Designations
(374158) 2004 UL
2004 UL
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc15.05 yr (5,498 days)
Aphelion2.4400 AU
Perihelion0.0928 AU
1.2664 AU
Eccentricity0.9267
1.43 yr (521 days)
320.92°
0° 41m 29.76s / day
Inclination23.785°
39.575°
149.57°
Earth MOID0.0182 AU (7.1 LD)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
  • 0.5–1.2 km (generic)[3]
  • 0.516 km (calculated)[4]
38±h[5][lower-alpha 1]
0.20 (assumed)[4]

(374158) 2004 UL is a sub-kilometer asteroid on an outstandingly eccentric orbit, classified as near-Earth object and potentially hazardous asteroid of the Apollo group.[2] The object is known for having the second-smallest perihelion of any known asteroid, after (137924) 2000 BD19.[citation needed]

It was discovered on 18 October 2004 by the Lincoln Near-Earth Asteroid Research (LINEAR) at Lincoln Lab's ETS near Socorro, New Mexico.[2]

Orbit and classification

This Apollo asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 0.09–2.44 AU once every 17 months (521 days; semi-major axis of 1.27 AU). Its orbit has an outstandingly high eccentricity of 0.93 and an inclination of 24° with respect to the ecliptic.[1]

Due to its orbit, it is also a Mercury-crosser, Venus-crosser and Mars-crosser. It has an Earth minimum orbital intersection distance of 0.0182 AU (2,720,000 km), which translates into 7.1 lunar distances.[1]

Physical characteristics

2004 UL is an assumed stony S-type asteroid.[4]

In October 2014, a rotational lightcurve for this asteroid was obtained from photometric observations by American astronomer Brian Warner at the CS3–Palmer Divide Station (U82) in Landers, California.[lower-alpha 1] It gave a longer-than average rotation period of 38±2 hours (most minor planets take 2–20 hours to complete a full rotation) with a high brightness variation of 1.2 magnitude, indicating a non-spheroidal shape (U=2).[5]

Based on a generic magnitude-to-diameter conversion, 2004 UL measures between 0.5 and 1.2 kilometers.[3] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for stony asteroids of 0.20 and calculates a diameter of 0.516 kilometers with an absolute magnitude of 18.8.[4]

Numbering and naming

This minor planet was numbered by the Minor Planet Center on 18 October 2013 (M.P.C. 85347).[6] As of 2018, it has not been named.[2]

Notes

  1. 1.0 1.1 Lightcurve plot for (374158) by B. D. Warner at the CS3-Palmer Divide Station from October/November 2014
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 Jewitt (2013). Abs. magnitude of 18.77 (R). Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (374158)

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 374158 (2004 UL)" (2016-10-07 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 "374158 (2004 UL)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  3. 3.0 3.1 "NEODyS (374158) 2004UL". Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site. Retrieved 7 March 2014.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4 4.5 "LCDB Data for (374158)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  5. 5.0 5.1 Warner, Brian D. (April 2015). "Near-Earth Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 October-December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (2): 115–127. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..115W. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 August 2016.
  6. "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 February 2018.

External links